Often asked: How Tight Should A Motorcycle Chain Be?

Is my motorcycle chain too loose?

Too tight is as bad as too loose, but it’ll only take minutes to get it right. You should check and adjust your chain every 500 miles (805 km), and more often for a dirt bike. 1.2–1.6 inches (30–40 mm) is typical for streetbikes, while dirt bikes may need 1.4–2.0 inches (35–50 mm) of slack.

How much slack should a bike chain have?

Chain Tension There should be approximately one half inch of movement in the chain up and down at a point half way between the front and rear sprockets. To change the tension loosen one of the axle-nuts and move the wheel forward or backward slightly and snug it up again.

What happens if motorcycle chain is loose?

* Chances of breaking the chain is very high, which might result in a harm for other parts of the motorcycle and the rider as well. * Reduced suspension travel due to the high amount of tension. * Power loss due to higher friction (though the amount is negligible).

You might be interested:  FAQ: When To Shift Gear In Motorcycle?

Can you use wd40 on motorcycle chain?

So, can I use WD-40 on my motorcycle chain? It is highly recommended that you do not use Multi-Purpose WD-40 on your motorcycle chain. The WD stands for Water Displacement, and it is designed to disperse water away from metal parts to prevent rust.

Why does my motorcycle chain keep getting tight?

A motorcycle chain that keeps getting loose is usually caused by the rear axle or chain tensioning bolts not being tight enough. It can also be cause by a new chain not being worn in enough, worn down sprocket teeth, having too tight of a tension, or having the wrong size of chain installed.

How long do motorcycle chains last?

So, how often should a motorcycle chain be replaced? In general, a properly maintained motorcycle can will last 20,000 to 30,000 miles, sometimes more. But, some last as little as 5,000 to 10,000 miles. This difference is due to the type of chain, how and where you ride, and how well you maintain it.

What causes motorcycle chain slap?

Over time, chains stretch and wear out. Once past their prime, these parts allow excessive slack leading to chain slap. Other less common but commonly overlooked reasons for excess chain slack include a loose rear axle or loose chain adjusters and improper rear suspension setup which can also cause chain binding.

Can you adjust motorcycle chain without stand?

You don’t need a stand to tighten your chain.. If you however have to lube and clean the chain you can lift the rear wheel easily by locking the front brake with a piece of string or duck tape, then tip the bike over towards the Sidestrand until the rear tire lifts off.

You might be interested:  Readers ask: How To Maintain A Motorcycle?

What happens if bike chain is too long?

A chain that’s too long (loose) may cause dropped chains and/or inconsistent shifting — front and back shifting. A chain that’s too short (tight) can cause even bigger problems. BUT, things can go really bad … if it does shift and rips the derailleur off, damages the chain or bends gear teeth.

Do bike chains stretch?

Do bicycle chains really stretch? The short answer is no, however they do wear in such a way as to cause their maximum length to increase. Mechanics usually refer to this as chain “ stretch.” It is the sign of a worn out chain that should be replaced. Illustration of extreme wear on a chain pin.

Is my chain too slack?

Check & Remove Chain The chain should be long enough to make this shift with two slight bends at each pulley of the rear derailleur. Next, shift to the smallest chainring and sprocket. There should be no slack in the chain, and the derailleur should not pull so far back that the chain contacts itself.

How much does it cost to tighten a motorcycle chain?

The local dealer charges $25 for a chain adjustment (that includes a cleaning and lube).

Do you need to lube a new motorcycle chain?

All chains benefit from regular lubrication. In addition to preserving o-ring seals and fighting corrosion, regular cleaning and greasing minimizes wear between sprocket teeth and chain rollers, and between rollers and bushings.